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Translators Aloud is a YouTube channel devoted to sharing the work of literary translators, for both published and unpublished works.

We provide a space for translators to read their own work and a positive platform for sharing great literature, read aloud by the translators themselves.

We showcase the world’s best new and classic books, poetry, plays, and short stories, presented by the talented people who translate them.


Recent Readings
Dear Beloved Humans offers a representative selection of poems by Grzegorz Wróblewski (b. 1962), a Polish writer and visual artist based for the last thirty-five years in Copenhagen. A third volume of Wróblewski’s poetry translated into English by Piotr Gwiazda, it shows its remarkable scope and variety, from the early 1980s poems, with their motifs of existential anxiety and radical estrangement, to those written in the last decade, with their satirical insights on nationalism and capitalism, among other topics. Above all Dear Beloved Humans signals that Wróblewski’s work should be read as a dynamic whole. It crystallizes the nature of his lifelong project: an attempt to portray, through something theoretically as simple and unassuming as poetry, what it means to be alive at this moment in the planet’s history. Incisive, uncompromising, yet also full of what Sharon Mesmer calls Wróblewski’s “melancholic hilarity,” Dear Beloved Humans is a document of our time and a not-so-hopeful message to our descendants. Praise for Dear Beloved Humans: In this book we find short brilliant grim verse tales — such as the tale of Anne who lives inside her white dress, or that of the poet who is the only one (including former cosmonauts!) remaining unconverted. Poem by poem we move through an inexorably dark circle of life, where poems’ speakers are in the process of disappearing faster and faster; where it feels like rain especially when it’s not raining and the weather generally is sexless and gray, uninspiring; where decline is described somberly yet shouted IN ALL CAPS; where a tick chose to bite you because you wore the flannel shirt the poem’s addressee had given as a birthday gift; where the gecko is perfect for loners. After a week of all this, the gecko poem informs us, “you’ll become social again,” but by then it will be marvelously too late. Grzegorz Wróblewski is the great sweetly sardonic poet of such humane belatedness. — Al Filreis The amazingly compressed poems in Dear Beloved Humans are constantly banging themselves against this world that makes no sense, but that most of us have nevertheless simply accepted, and Wróblewski has taken on the poetic task of jarring us into a renewed apprehension of the world’s terrible, hilarious absurdity. “What took place a moment ago / no longer has any importance,” he says — not when we’re utterly surrounded by the horrors of history, hunger, aging, lust, and endless wars “they all” lose “but claim / they won.” Wróblewski’s pessimism is fantastic, entertaining, and timeless. I laughed out loud while reading this book, then got up from my chair feeling truly shaken. — Wayne Miller Links to buy: https://www.lavenderink.org/site/shop/dear-beloved-humans/?v=76cb0a18730b https://www.spdbooks.org/Products/9781956921144/dear-beloved-humans.aspx Author bio Born in Poland in 1962 and living in Denmark since 1985, Grzegorz Wróblewski is one of Poland’s major contemporary writers. He has published over a dozen of volumes of poetry, prose, and drama in Poland, as well as several books in Denmark and other countries. As a visual artist, he has exhibited his paintings in various galleries in Denmark, Germany, England, and Poland. English translations of his poetry appear in A Marzipan Factory (trans. Adam Zdrodowski, Otoliths, 2010), Kopenhaga (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Zephyr Press, 2013), Let’s Go Back to the Mainland (trans. Agnieszka Pokojska, Červená Barva Press, 2014), Zero Visibility (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Phoneme Media/Deep Vellum, 2017), and Dear Beloved Humans: Selected Poems (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Diálogos Books, 2023). Translator bio Born in Poland in 1973 and living in the United States since 1991, Piotr Gwiazda is the translator of Grzegorz Wróblewski’s Kopenhaga (Zephyr Press, 2013), Zero Visibility (Phoneme Media/Deep Vellum, 2017), and Dear Beloved Humans: Selected Poems (Diálogos Books, 2023). He is also the author of three books of poems, Aspects of Strangers (Moria Books, 2016), Messages (Pond Road Press, 2012), and Gagarin Street (Washington Writers’ Publishing House, 2005) and of two books of literary criticism, US Poetry in the Age of Empire, 1979-2012 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) and James Merrill and W.H. Auden (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). He is Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. For more information about his work, visit: http://piotrgwiazda.net/. Twitter: @piotrgwiazda

Dear Beloved Humans offers a representative selection of poems by Grzegorz Wróblewski (b. 1962), a Polish writer and visual artist based for the last thirty-five years in Copenhagen. A third volume of Wróblewski’s poetry translated into English by Piotr Gwiazda, it shows its remarkable scope and variety, from the early 1980s poems, with their motifs of existential anxiety and radical estrangement, to those written in the last decade, with their satirical insights on nationalism and capitalism, among other topics. Above all Dear Beloved Humans signals that Wróblewski’s work should be read as a dynamic whole. It crystallizes the nature of his lifelong project: an attempt to portray, through something theoretically as simple and unassuming as poetry, what it means to be alive at this moment in the planet’s history. Incisive, uncompromising, yet also full of what Sharon Mesmer calls Wróblewski’s “melancholic hilarity,” Dear Beloved Humans is a document of our time and a not-so-hopeful message to our descendants.


Praise for Dear Beloved Humans:

In this book we find short brilliant grim verse tales — such as the tale of Anne who lives inside her white dress, or that of the poet who is the only one (including former cosmonauts!) remaining unconverted. Poem by poem we move through an inexorably dark circle of life, where poems’ speakers are in the process of disappearing faster and faster; where it feels like rain especially when it’s not raining and the weather generally is sexless and gray, uninspiring; where decline is described somberly yet shouted IN ALL CAPS; where a tick chose to bite you because you wore the flannel shirt the poem’s addressee had given as a birthday gift; where the gecko is perfect for loners. After a week of all this, the gecko poem informs us, “you’ll become social again,” but by then it will be marvelously too late. Grzegorz Wróblewski is the great sweetly sardonic poet of such humane belatedness.

— Al Filreis

The amazingly compressed poems in Dear Beloved Humans are constantly banging themselves against this world that makes no sense, but that most of us have nevertheless simply accepted, and Wróblewski has taken on the poetic task of jarring us into a renewed apprehension of the world’s terrible, hilarious absurdity. “What took place a moment ago / no longer has any importance,” he says — not when we’re utterly surrounded by the horrors of history, hunger, aging, lust, and endless wars “they all” lose “but claim / they won.” Wróblewski’s pessimism is fantastic, entertaining, and timeless. I laughed out loud while reading this book, then got up from my chair feeling truly shaken.

— Wayne Miller

Links to buy:
https://www.lavenderink.org/site/shop/dear-beloved-humans/?v=76cb0a18730b
https://www.spdbooks.org/Products/9781956921144/dear-beloved-humans.aspx

Author bio
Born in Poland in 1962 and living in Denmark since 1985, Grzegorz Wróblewski is one of Poland’s major contemporary writers. He has published over a dozen of volumes of poetry, prose, and drama in Poland, as well as several books in Denmark and other countries. As a visual artist, he has exhibited his paintings in various galleries in Denmark, Germany, England, and Poland. English translations of his poetry appear in A Marzipan Factory (trans. Adam Zdrodowski, Otoliths, 2010), Kopenhaga (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Zephyr Press, 2013), Let’s Go Back to the Mainland (trans. Agnieszka Pokojska, Červená Barva Press, 2014), Zero Visibility (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Phoneme Media/Deep Vellum, 2017), and Dear Beloved Humans: Selected Poems (trans. Piotr Gwiazda, Diálogos Books, 2023).


Translator bio
Born in Poland in 1973 and living in the United States since 1991, Piotr Gwiazda is the translator of Grzegorz Wróblewski’s Kopenhaga (Zephyr Press, 2013), Zero Visibility (Phoneme Media/Deep Vellum, 2017), and Dear Beloved Humans: Selected Poems (Diálogos Books, 2023). He is also the author of three books of poems, Aspects of Strangers (Moria Books, 2016), Messages (Pond Road Press, 2012), and Gagarin Street (Washington Writers’ Publishing House, 2005) and of two books of literary criticism, US Poetry in the Age of Empire, 1979-2012 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) and James Merrill and W.H. Auden (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). He is Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. For more information about his work, visit: http://piotrgwiazda.net/.
Twitter: @piotrgwiazda

YouTube Video VVVqYXE5T1Nwb0Vlb2hQbUs4WlQtQzd3LlVydzd5REpvRHlJ

Piotr Gwiazda reads from Grzegorz Wróblewski's DEAR BELOVED HUMANS: SELECTED POEMS (Dialog Books)

7 Feb, 2024 7:00 pm

Isabel Stainsby reads from Kristina Nesvedová's WHO'S AT LARGE IN THE LARDER? (seeking a publisher)

31 Jan, 2024 7:00 pm

Jeanne Bonner reads the poems of Edith Bruck (seeking a publisher)

24 Jan, 2024 7:00 pm



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