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Translators Aloud is a YouTube channel devoted to sharing the work of literary translators, for both published and unpublished works.

We provide a space for translators to read their own work and a positive platform for sharing great literature, read aloud by the translators themselves.

We showcase the world’s best new and classic books, poetry, plays, and short stories, presented by the talented people who translate them.


Recent Readings
10% different, 100% special: how to turn your difference into your greatest strength You can't sit still. You don't like unannounced visitors. You always triple-check if the lights are out. But you also see details that no one else notices. You're always coming up with surprising solutions. You can focus intensely for hours at a stretch. Usually without realising it, many people lie somewhere on the spectrum of a neurodivergent condition. We often tend to focus on the many downsides of neurodivergent conditions such as AD(h)D, ASD, dyslexia and OCD. This book takes a different approach by looking in depth at the special talents that go hand in hand with these conditions. Whether you already have a diagnosis or simply feel you're somewhere on the neuroatypical spectrum, one thing is certain: once you've identified your unique talents, you'll be able to make more focused choices in your life and work. You'll discover which jobs best showcase your talents, which colleagues complement your personality, and which environments and corporate cultures are right for you. The authors: Peter Ampe is an internationally acclaimed advertising creative and columnist whose writing credits include the UK-based creativity magazine Little Black Book. He has distinct traits of ASD and ADHD. This book was co-written with his wife, Emily Rammant. Emily is a business engineer and co-founder of the coaching firm YIN United. She supports people and businesses with defining their identity, leadership style and corporate culture. The translator: Sue Anderson translates from Dutch, French and German, focusing on academic, educational and literary nonfiction. She is a Fellow of the UK’s Institute of Translation and Interpreting, a member of the Society of Authors and an accredited translator with Flanders Literature.

10% different, 100% special: how to turn your difference into your greatest strength

You can't sit still. You don't like unannounced visitors. You always triple-check if the lights are out. But you also see details that no one else notices. You're always coming up with surprising solutions. You can focus intensely for hours at a stretch. Usually without realising it, many people lie somewhere on the spectrum of a neurodivergent condition.
We often tend to focus on the many downsides of neurodivergent conditions such as AD(h)D, ASD, dyslexia and OCD. This book takes a different approach by looking in depth at the special talents that go hand in hand with these conditions. Whether you already have a diagnosis or simply feel you're somewhere on the neuroatypical spectrum, one thing is certain: once you've identified your unique talents, you'll be able to make more focused choices in your life and work. You'll discover which jobs best showcase your talents, which colleagues complement your personality, and which environments and corporate cultures are right for you.

The authors:
Peter Ampe is an internationally acclaimed advertising creative and columnist whose writing credits include the UK-based creativity magazine Little Black Book. He has distinct traits of ASD and ADHD. This book was co-written with his wife, Emily Rammant. Emily is a business engineer and co-founder of the coaching firm YIN United. She supports people and businesses with defining their identity, leadership style and corporate culture.

The translator:
Sue Anderson translates from Dutch, French and German, focusing on academic, educational and literary nonfiction. She is a Fellow of the UK’s Institute of Translation and Interpreting, a member of the Society of Authors and an accredited translator with Flanders Literature.

YouTube Video VVVqYXE5T1Nwb0Vlb2hQbUs4WlQtQzd3LnRBclAwUVl0TzJB

Sue Anderson reads from Peter Ampe & Emily Rammant's GREAT MINDS THINK UNALIKE (Lannoo, 2023)

10 Jul, 2024 6:00 pm

This book is an account of the life-changing power of literature. These stories from around the world showcase how literature can have a lasting impact on individuals, altering their paths in unexpected ways. The collection features 29 very short stories: most are only about 4-5 pages long, followed by 1-2 pages of biographical detail about each author. In this short space, the author sets the scene and describes the problem that the book will help the reader address. He uses language economically, yet each predicament is so vividly described that the people practically walk off the page. In order to explain how each particular book was helpful, he has to describe something of the book itself, but he does so with a light touch which is never formulaic, sketching in just enough detail to explain the book’s effect on the reader. Although With Moby Dick is not primarily about the author, he uses the foreword and title story to explain the concept of the book and provide an example from his own life: how a copy of Moby Dick by Hermann Melville inspired his friend to abandon teaching and become an officer on a container ship. Many of the stories involve people that the author has known, and this makes them immediate and convincing. Schwarz fully empathises with each of his readers, and this makes it easy for us to do the same. The author’s enthusiasm for reading is perhaps not surprising: he is a professional educator who works with young people and often witnesses the important role that literature (still) has to play. But it is very much to his credit that he never preaches - he shows rather than tells, using fascinating and amusing episodes from his own life to provide an additional layer of authenticity. I enjoyed this book very much, especially the episodes where I knew the book in question. It was a kind of armchair travel, imagining other people enjoying the same books as me under different circumstances and in contrasting locations. I think this book would be welcomed by English readers: both by bookworms keen to share other readers’ experiences and by those who are looking for the next inspirational read but are reluctant simply to reach for the latest bestseller. It’s a treasure-trove of reading ideas, compiled in an accessible but very compact format. It would be a good book to dip into at odd moments but also the perfect read for a commute, where you could perhaps enjoy one story a day. I think it would be welcomed by teachers of children and young people, and anyone who has ever tried to run a book club, and I think every library should have a copy! AUTHOR BIO Roland Schwarz was born in Austria and studied in Graz, Oxford and Ljubljana. His love of travelling stayed with him after his studies: he taught in the USA, then returned to Upper Austria for a long time and currently teaches at the Austrian School in Prague. Books are his great passion and he is determined to pass this on to as many people as possible. TRANSLATOR BIO Gwen Clayton is a translator working from German and Japanese into English. As a child she lived in Switzerland and the UK (with her German mother) but she read Japanese Studies at university (St Catherine’s College, Oxford) and went on to spend nine years studying and working in Japan. Having formerly worked as a commercial lawyer, she now specialises in legal and literary translation and lives in London. +44 7841 387526/+44 20 8870 2748 gwenclayton@perfectlyphrased.com www.perfectlyphrased.com LinkedIn (Gwen Clayton) FOR RIGHTS INFO, CONTACT: Dr Michaela Schachner | Publishing Director Verlag Anton Pustet Bergstrasse 12, 5020 Salzburg michaela.schachner@spv-verlage.at www.pustet.at Tel.: +43 0662 87 35 07 20 The translator has obtained permission from the original rights holder to translate this sample and share a recording of it on Translators Aloud.

This book is an account of the life-changing power of literature. These stories from around the world showcase how literature can have a lasting impact on individuals, altering their paths in unexpected ways. The collection features 29 very short stories: most are only about 4-5 pages long, followed by 1-2 pages of biographical detail about each author. In this short space, the author sets the scene and describes the problem that the book will help the reader address. He uses language economically, yet each predicament is so vividly described that the people practically walk off the page. In order to explain how each particular book was helpful, he has to describe something of the book itself, but he does so with a light touch which is never formulaic, sketching in just enough detail to explain the book’s effect on the reader.

Although With Moby Dick is not primarily about the author, he uses the foreword and title story to explain the concept of the book and provide an example from his own life: how a copy of Moby Dick by Hermann Melville inspired his friend to abandon teaching and become an officer on a container ship. Many of the stories involve people that the author has known, and this makes them immediate and convincing. Schwarz fully empathises with each of his readers, and this makes it easy for us to do the same. The author’s enthusiasm for reading is perhaps not surprising: he is a professional educator who works with young people and often witnesses the important role that literature (still) has to play. But it is very much to his credit that he never preaches - he shows rather than tells, using fascinating and amusing episodes from his own life to provide an additional layer of authenticity.

I enjoyed this book very much, especially the episodes where I knew the book in question. It was a kind of armchair travel, imagining other people enjoying the same books as me under different circumstances and in contrasting locations. I think this book would be welcomed by English readers: both by bookworms keen to share other readers’ experiences and by those who are looking for the next inspirational read but are reluctant simply to reach for the latest bestseller. It’s a treasure-trove of reading ideas, compiled in an accessible but very compact format. It would be a good book to dip into at odd moments but also the perfect read for a commute, where you could perhaps enjoy one story a day. I think it would be welcomed by teachers of children and young people, and anyone who has ever tried to run a book club, and I think every library should have a copy!


AUTHOR BIO

Roland Schwarz was born in Austria and studied in Graz, Oxford and Ljubljana. His love of travelling stayed with him after his studies: he taught in the USA, then returned to Upper Austria for a long time and currently teaches at the Austrian School in Prague. Books are his great passion and he is determined to pass this on to as many people as possible.


TRANSLATOR BIO

Gwen Clayton is a translator working from German and Japanese into English. As a child she lived in Switzerland and the UK (with her German mother) but she read Japanese Studies at university (St Catherine’s College, Oxford) and went on to spend nine years studying and working in Japan. Having formerly worked as a commercial lawyer, she now specialises in legal and literary translation and lives in London.

+44 7841 387526/+44 20 8870 2748
gwenclayton@perfectlyphrased.com
www.perfectlyphrased.com
LinkedIn (Gwen Clayton)

FOR RIGHTS INFO, CONTACT:

Dr Michaela Schachner | Publishing Director
Verlag Anton Pustet
Bergstrasse 12, 5020 Salzburg
michaela.schachner@spv-verlage.at
www.pustet.at
Tel.: +43 0662 87 35 07 20

The translator has obtained permission from the original rights holder to translate this sample and share a recording of it on Translators Aloud.

YouTube Video VVVqYXE5T1Nwb0Vlb2hQbUs4WlQtQzd3LmVwY2JLUll5dzJr

Gwen Clayton reads from Roland Schwarz's WITH MOBY DICK ON A CONTAINER SHIP (seeking a publisher)

26 Jun, 2024 6:00 pm

Part memoir, part profile, Alexander Osang’s Almost Light is a moving, personal reckoning with the years surrounding the fall of the Berlin Wall. Told over the course of several white nights on the Baltic and in St. Petersburg, Almost Light sets the author's memories of the East against those of an eccentric acquaintance, Uwe. As their stories diverge and intersect, Osang’s direct, perceptive storytelling captures the ambivalence, the euphoria and the confusion of that strange time— the sense of a brighter world always on the horizon, never quite within reach. Appealing to readers of Karl Ove Knausgård, Katherine Boo, and those interested in the line between reporter and subject, reality and memory. Author bio Alexander Osang, born in Berlin in 1962, studied in Leipzig and worked as Chief Reporter for the Berliner Zeitung after the Fall of the Berlin Wall. Since 1999, he has been working as a reporter for SPIEGEL, from New York for eight years and from Tel Aviv up until 2020. His reports have been awarded the Egon Erwin Kisch Prize and the Theodor Wolff Prize numerous times. Today he lives with his family in Berlin. His most recent novel, The Life of Elena Silber, was nominated for the German Book Prize. Translator bio Ruby Bilger was born in Brooklyn in 1996 and holds a BA from Yale University, where she studied creative writing and American History. She recently translated Norbert Sachser’s “Much Like Us,” which won a Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2023. For rights info contact: i.ihmels@aufbau-verlage.de The translator has obtained permission from the original rights holder to translate this sample and to share a recording of it on Translators Aloud.

Part memoir, part profile, Alexander Osang’s Almost Light is a moving, personal reckoning with the years surrounding the fall of the Berlin Wall. Told over the course of several white nights on the Baltic and in St. Petersburg, Almost Light sets the author's memories of the East against those of an eccentric acquaintance, Uwe. As their stories diverge and intersect, Osang’s direct, perceptive storytelling captures the ambivalence, the euphoria and the confusion of that strange time— the sense of a brighter world always on the horizon, never quite within reach.

Appealing to readers of Karl Ove Knausgård, Katherine Boo, and those interested in the line between reporter and subject, reality and memory.


Author bio
Alexander Osang, born in Berlin in 1962, studied in Leipzig and worked as Chief Reporter for the Berliner Zeitung after the Fall of the Berlin Wall. Since 1999, he has been working as a reporter for SPIEGEL, from New York for eight years and from Tel Aviv up until 2020. His reports have been awarded the Egon Erwin Kisch Prize and the Theodor Wolff Prize numerous times. Today he lives with his family in Berlin. His most recent novel, The Life of Elena Silber, was nominated for the German Book Prize.

Translator bio
Ruby Bilger was born in Brooklyn in 1996 and holds a BA from Yale University, where she studied creative writing and American History. She recently translated Norbert Sachser’s “Much Like Us,” which won a Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2023.

For rights info contact: i.ihmels@aufbau-verlage.de


The translator has obtained permission from the original rights holder to translate this sample and to share a recording of it on Translators Aloud.

YouTube Video VVVqYXE5T1Nwb0Vlb2hQbUs4WlQtQzd3LnljQ2tqMENCX3Q4

Ruby Bilger reads from Alexander Osang's ALMOST LIGHT (seeking a publisher)

19 Jun, 2024 6:00 pm



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